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Two Lovers and a Bear

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January 26, 2017

Two Lovers and a Bear      Canada

Location: SilverCity

Showtimes: 6:30 & 8:20 pm

Director: Kim Nguyen
Cast: Tatiana Maslany, Dane DeHaan, Gordon Pinsent
Runtime: 96 minutes
Language: English

Rating: 14A; scenes of nudity

“Kim Nguyen finds raw authenticity in his location, and in the volatile chemistry between his two stars.”—Brian D. Johnson, Maclean’s Magazine

Kim Nguyen’s Two Lovers and a Bear is no ordinary love story. The film unfolds in remote, snowbound Nunavut. The movie’s unique setting and tonal surprises helps create a refreshingly compelling and unpredictable tale.

The two lovers in question are Roman (Dane DeHaan) and Lucy (Tatiana Maslany), a pair of damaged twenty-somethings. Both are haunted by the memories of their fathers. The couple finds solace in each other’s company and in the refuge their isolated town provides. However, their relationship becomes strained when Lucy receives an acceptation letter to a biology degree that requires her to move “down south”, a notion which Roman initially recoils from.

To reconnect with each other and escape their personal demons, the pair set off on snowmobiles, heading ‘down south’ into Nunavit’s snowy expanses. But things take a turn when a large snowstorm forces the pair to take shelter inside a desolate bunker where Lucy becomes literally haunted by her past.

Both DeHaan and Maslany deliver emotionally-charged performances, exuding a convincing, deep connection. There’s a real rawness and intimacy to their sex scenes, which adds another layer of authenticity to their volatile relationship.

Nguyen composes a series of captivating, tonally-diverse sequences which keep events thrillingly unpredictable. The recurring surreal run-ins with a sarcastic talking polar bear (dryly voiced by Gordon Pinsent) generate humour in the most unexpected of ways. Jesse Zubot’s unsettling, adeptly varied score smoothly facilitates these changes in tone.

The film’s final image is a poignant, beautiful and completely fitting end to the couple’s tale. In Two Lovers and a Bear, Nguyen has crafted a surprising, touching and deeply resonant love story.

 

Manchester by the Sea

By | 2016-2017 Season, Uncategorised | No Comments

February 2, 2017

Manchester by the Sea

Drama, USA, English

Location: SilverCity

Showtimes: 6:30 & 8:55 pm

Director: Kenneth Lonergan
Cast: Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams, Kyle Chandler

Run time :137 min

Rating: R

Review by Eli Glasner, CBC

Time doesn’t heal all wounds. Some we just carry with us, our faces flushed with shame when the memories surface.

Manchester by the Sea, the latest film from director Kenneth Lonergan, is about a place where regret — like the grey skies of Massachusetts — is a constant feature.

Casey Affleck stars as a man known in his hometown as “the Lee Chandler.” A fog of notoriety follows him: his head hangs, his shoulders slump under the weight. It’s why Lee’s relocated to Boston, where he works joylessly as a janitor dealing with leaky faucets, horny tenants and ending each evening in a drunken stupor.

But a phone call about his brother changes his plans.

Joe — played in flashbacks by Kyle Chandler — has died, leaving Lee as guardian of his 16-year-old son, Patrick. Lee is expected to relocate home to Manchester-by-the-Sea, move in with his nephew and wind down his brother’s fishing business.

Though he’s grieving, young Patrick’s life — as opposed to his uncle’s — is moving forward. Lucas Hedges portrays the teen as a flesh-and-blood character, juggling multiple girlfriends and a scrappy garage band. It leads to the two butting heads over Lee’s plan to relocate back to Boston.

What follows is a delicate dance with Lee struggling to adjust, while also backtracking and building up to the moment that everything changed. Emerging from the shadow of his elder brother Ben, Casey Affleck has come into his own as an intense actor: confident in his stillness, content let his searching eyes do the work. While there is a similarity in this self-defeated slacker to some of Affleck’s previous roles, Lonergan allows his star to create a portrait of pain unencumbered by the usual redemptive clichés.

With a sad, glazed expression in his eyes, there’s an aura of self-loathing that permeates Lee’s every interaction. He’s desperate to escape his past as well as this new role, which leads to some amusingly awkward moments.

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A supporting character’s sputtered line — “We’re trying to lose some kids at this point” — underlines the strength and easy humour of Lonergan’s naturalistic dialogue. America’s obsession with the blue-collar stories of its northeastern shore continues unabated with Manchester by the Sea, but these blunt, straight-talking New Englanders certainly give the film a few moments of much needed levity.

It’s natural to expect a resolution and Manchester by the Sea teases us with possibilities. There’s a wonderfully delicate street scene where Lee bumps into his ex-wife, played by a tenacious Michelle Williams. The two engage in small talk, but you can see pain written across the worry lines of Affleck’s face.

Like much of the film, the moment is sparse and searing. Lonergan doesn’t let his characters off easy. In the end, what makes the film stand apart isn’t its authentic flavours or visceral performances, but the story’s integrity — a rare commitment to truth that deserves to be seen.

 

Love and Friendship

By | 2016-2017 Season, Uncategorised | No Comments

January 19, 2017

Love and Friendship

Ireland/France/Netherlands

Location: SilverCity

Showtimes: 6:30 & 8:20 pm

Director: Whit Stillman
Cast: Kate Beckinsale, Clöe Sevigny,
Language: English and French

Drama/Romance/Comedy

Rating: PG

“With his love of fine clothes and finer diction, Whit Stillman proves an unsurprisingly intuitive fit for Austen, but he also knows just how to give her pointed social satire an extra stab of wink-wink postmodern drollery without breaking the spell.” – Justin Chang, Variet

Far from their rhinestone-littered stomping grounds in The Last Days of Disco, Kate Beckinsale and Chloë Sevigny reunite with American director Whit Stillman for a zesty shot of baroque fun.

Based on an early Jane Austen novella called Lady Susan, the sardonically titled Love & Friendship gives us a delightfully detestable villain in Beckinsale’s career high, as Lady Susan Vernon. This being pre-Victorian England the only way a woman can achieve anything is through charm and conniving. And, as someone states, Susan is a “genius of the evil kind” at manipulating everyone else.

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The only person she’s remotely straight with is her American-expat friend, Mrs. Johnson (Sevigny), but that’s mostly because the latter is so ceaselessly admiring. Plus, this allows Susan to explain her motives and strategy.

Recently widowed, she survives by rotating visits with wealthy friends and relatives, sometimes decamping in a hurry. When we meet her, she has alighted at the country estate of sister-in-law Catherine DeCourcy Vernon (Emma Greenwall). Catherine’s handsome younger brother, Reginald (Xavier Samuel), initially shares her wariness of Susan’s scorched-earth reputation, but soon after meeting the beautiful widow he’s valiantly defending her from the “vile calumnies” of others. She has a well-polished knack for turning insults back on her accusers, but is not at her best around mousy teenage daughter Frederica, played by Morfydd Clark (Pride and Prejudice, Zombies).

Stillman uses Austen as the foundation for the story and then adds some twists of his own. Silent-movie devices, on-screen typography, and Mozartian music all bring out her farcical qualities—underlined by unforgettable comic visits from Tom Bennett as “a bit of a rattle” courting reluctant Frederica. But L&F’s burnished cinematography and elegant performances offer a droll soulfulness that embodies everything we still love, and like, about Jane Austen.

Café Society

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September 29, 2016

Café Society   USA

Location: SilverCity

Showtimes: 6:40 & 8:25 pm

Director: Woody Allen
Cast: Steve Carell, Jesse Eisenberg, Kristen Stewart, Blake Lively, Parker Posey Runtime: 96 minutes
Language: English

Rating: PG

cafe-society“A sweet retro-romance set mostly in old-time Hollywood. Cast is marvelous.”—James Verniere, Boston Herald.
Woody Allen of late has been relishing the glow of nostalgia in his films. Among his recent (and more successful) forays, Midnight in Paris beautifully blended modernist impulses with his reverence for the past. More introspective in tone, Café Society sometimes resembles Radio Days in its skeptical affection for the jazz-tinged world of his parents.

The new film’s Woody surrogate is Jesse Eisenberg, a guileless yet oddly arrogant New Yorker named Bobby, making his way alone in mid-’30s Hollywood. His uncle Phil, played with shark-like precision by Steve Carell, is a big-shot agent who takes forever to lend Bobby a hand. But, more importantly, he introduces the kid to his sexy, self-assured assistant, Vonnie, Kristen Stewart, who’s good in a more supple role. She has a boyfriend who never seems to be around, and Vonnie shares Bobby’s jaded view of the studio world.

Bobby’s Left Coast adventures—narrated by the director—are intercut with scenes from the reality he left behind, represented by his comically bickering parents (Jeannie Berlin and Ken Stott) and “tough Jew” brother Ben (Corey Stoll), whose gangster ways have been keeping the family afloat during the Great Depression. Ben also runs a chi-chi nightclub, where Bobby finds some romantic competition for Vonnie in the form of Blake Lively. A sense of unfinished business hangs over them, giving this sun-dappled snow globe a bittersweet air.

The goings-on benefits greatly from its impressive cast, particularly Eisenberg who is especially strong here. The film is lightweight, charming and affable. Special mention goes to famed cinematographer Vittorio Storaro (Apocalypse Now, Last Tango in Paris) whose sumptuous cinematography gives Café Society moments of golden-hued enchantment.

 

 

Captain Fantastic

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September 29, 2016

Captain Fantastic   USA

Location: SilverCity

Showtimes: 6:30 & 8:40 pm

Director: Matt Ross
Cast: Viggo Mortensen, Frank Langella, George MacKay, Kathryn Hahn
Runtime: 118 minutes
Language: English
Rating: 14A

“Captain Fantastic leaves viewers with the cheering, deeply affecting image of a dad whose superpowers lie in simply doing the best that he can.” – Ann Hornaday, Washington Post

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Un Certain Regard Award (directing), Cannes Film Festival; Directors to Watch Award, Palm Springs International Film Festival; Best Film, Seattle International Film Festival.

 

Not to be confused with the stable of superheroes currently cramming cinema screens, Matt Ross’ Captain Fantastic is an engaging, comic family road movie. Viggo Mortensen is bearded Ben, who, along with his wife (Trin Miller) have taken their brood of six kids ‘way off the grid, living in a yurt in rural Washington.

 

The kids all have made-up names. They are trained in martial arts and rock-climbing. Their food is either hunted or grown. They read books assigned by dad, ranging from Dostoyevsky to particle physics. They have comical philosophical disputes.

 

However, when mom dies, their world is completely rocked, revealing budding fissures in the family unit. Upon learning that Jack, (Frank Langella) their mom’s father and their grandfather, is planning a Christian funeral, the appalled troupe head off in the family bus to New Mexico.

 

The oddness of the family begins to look less bizarre when compared to the freakishness that passes for 21st century American normality. A trip to a diner, a supermarket, and a tussle with a traffic policeman result in some amusing cultural conflicts. The family’s naiveté is blithely illustrated when father Ben greets the morning in the buff: “It’s only a penis,” he tells a passing elderly couple.

However it is at the funeral where they confront mom’s parents and come to realize that their lifestyle might not be sustainable as the forces of reaction line up against them.

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Captain Fantastic benefits from a witty, politically aware script. The kids are enjoyable and Mortensen is wonderful in the title role, showing a light hand at comedy. Perhaps it is not so ironic to realize that Captain Fantastic really may be a superhero movie after all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ll See You in My Dreams

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March 31st, 2016

Location: SilverCity

Showtime: 8:20 pm

Director: Brett Haley
Cast: Blythe Danner, Martin Starr, Sam Elliott
Runtime: 95 minutes
Rating: PG

“A modest, quietly touching portrait of an older woman radiantly portrayed by Blyth Danner.” – Stephen Holden, New York Times

“What “I’ll See You” does particularly well is get at how any relationship – whatever your age – comes with a limited, rather than a lifetime, warranty.” – Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times

Nominations: Georgia Film Critics Association Awards, Gotham Awards: Best Actress,

Blythe Danner

I’ll See You in My Dreams is an anti-sentimental look at aging and the complexity of human connections when we have more history than future.

Blythe Danner gives a quietly potent performance as Carol, part of the Greenwich Village folk scene when she was young and then a moderately bored schoolteacher who retired when her husband died—a whopping 20 years earlier.

She passes her days reading, drinking white wine, and meeting three long-time pals (played delightfully by Rhea Perlman, June Squibb, and Mary Kay Place) for bridge or golf at their nearby retirement complex.

Her modest Los Angeles bungalow is a bit barren, but she does have a dog and a pool, and the latter is how she happens to meet an unlikely cleaner called Lloyd. Martin Starr plays Lloyd with a Paul Rudd–like mix of boyish charm and self-aware melancholy. A budding, if not very good, musician, Lloyd encourages Carol to reclaim some of her youthful expressiveness.

Carol soon gets distracted by attentions from new golf-club member Bill, played by silver-’stached Sam Elliott with undiminished sexiness and that ram-tough voice. The cigar-chomping Bill questions Carol’s habitual ways and, to the credit of writer-director Brett Haley, she doesn’t quite figure out how she feels about that. This is apparent with the late arrival of Carol’s daughter (Malin Akerman), whose presence seems to bring out the older woman’s more selfish qualities.

The film is a small masterwork of deceptively ordinary dialogue and exceptionally realistic emotions. Its characters, whatever their age, yearn for earlier dreams. But their eyes remain open.

Remember

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SilverCity at 6:30 pm

Director: Atom Egoyan

Cast:  Christopher Plummer, Martin Landau, Dean Norris

Runtime: 95 minutes

Canada,  Language: English

Rating: 14A

Venice Film Festival, Vittorio Veneto Award: Atom Egoyan;

Mar del Plata Film Festival, Cinecolor Award: Atom Egoyan

Canadian Screen Award Nominations: Best Picture, Screenplay, Actor, Christopher Plummer

“At its best, Remember creates plot devices of almost Hitchcockian cleverness.”—Kate Taylor, Globe and Mail

“….This is the most linear storytelling Egoyan has done in ages, and also the most satisfying.”—Linda Bernard, Toronto Star

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Atom Egoyan’s most entertaining movie in years, Remember follows Holocaust survivor Zev Gutman (Christopher Plummer) as he embarks on a journey to find and kill the former Nazi responsible for his family’s death during the war.

The Memento-like premise is utilized to exceedingly agreeable effect by director Atom Egoyan and screenwriter Benjamin August, as the movie’s first half benefits substantially from an emphasis on the mystery behind Zev’s hand-written orders – with the character’s quest, which is consistently hindered by his crumbling mental state, heightened by Plummer’s typically masterful turn.

The episodic midsection works exceedingly well as Zev begins tracking down and confronting one aging ex-Nazi after another – with many of these segments possessing a tense, engrossing vibe that proves impossible to resist.

There’s little doubt that the movie’s highlight is one such visit, as Zev engages in a progressively perilous encounter with the son (Dean Norris, delivering a riveting performance) of one of his targetss

It’s clear, too, that Remember works as an affecting drama and look at the rigors of aging, while the surprising third act ensures that the movie ends on an exceedingly positive note – which ultimately does secure the picture’s place as a top-notch thriller from a director who is making a welcome uptick in his career.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Macbeth

By | 2015-2016 Season, Uncategorised | No Comments

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Macbeth

UK, France, USA

Thursday, March 10, 2016Location: SilverCity

Showtimes: 6:30 pm & 8:35 pm

Director: Justin Kurzel

Cast: Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, David Thewlis, Sean Harris

Runtime: 113 minutes

Rating: 14A

Warning: Scenes of violence

“Marion Cotillard and Michael Fassbender excel in Justin Kurzel’s thrillingly savage interpretation of the Scottish Play” – Guy Lodge, Variety

“Michael Fassbender as the murderous general of infamy and Marion Cotillard as his complicit wife. Two of the world’s finest actors, they make a magnetic pair.”–Peter Howell, Toronto Star

Macbeth returns to the big screen with earthy energy, visual style and roaring performances. Australian filmmaker Justin Kurzel uses sweeping landscapes and harsh weather to envelope the characters in this haunting tale of ambition and murder.

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At the start of this brilliant, brutal rendition of Shakespeare’s Scottish Play, Michael Fassbender’s Macbeth is mourning his dead son in an eerie funeral rite before the tiny body is burned on a pyre. Traditionally, the Macbeths have been portrayed as power-hungry. Australian director Justin Kurzel recasts them as damaged. Untethered by grief, ambition fills the void, as Lady Macbeth (Marion Cotillard) lures her husband into dark places, leading to the murder of the king (David Thewlis).
This is one of Shakespeare’s bleakest, leanest plays, and Kurzel gives it an intriguingly expansive tone by setting most of the action outdoors. The battle sequences are intense, the violence creating greater resonance within the characters.

Fassbender is utterly convincing as the battle-weary warrior: his face is a map of scars, with the hollowed-out, blank-eyed look of a man who has seen too much death (Fassbender is said to have interpreted his Macbeth as suffering from PTSD). Cotillard, with her captivating face, makes her Lady Macbeth subtle and human, yet tormented.

The wild Scottish Highlands, with its hardness and beauty, is a landscape that seems to have a murderous impulse of its own. And Kurzel directs this Shakespeare like a western: spare and savage.

 

The Lady in the Van

By | 2015-2016 Season | No Comments

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Thursday, February 25, 2016
6:30 & 8:25pm
United Kingdom

Director: Nicholas Hytner

Cast:  Maggie Smith, Dominic Cooper, James Corden
Runtime: 104 minutes
Rating: PG

Golden Globe Nomination Best Performance Actress in Comedy or Musical: Maggie Smith

“There are few false notes in the sturdy, pleasantly entertaining The Lady in the Van.”–Jake Coyle, Associated Press

The Lady in the Van is based on actual events in the life of British writer Alan Bennett that he turned into a book in 1989, a play in 1999, and now a film directed by Nicholas Hytner.

Alex Jennings plays Bennett, who we first see as moving into the Camdem neighbourhood of London. It’s the 1970s, and Bennett is a shy, witty sort known for appearances onstage and writing plays for the stage and TV.

Maggie Smith is Miss Shepherd, a bag lady, living out of a dilapidated van. She exudes a mixture of frayed gentility punctuated by paranoid conspiracy theories and schizophrenic rants, with a bit of daft humour and grace. The neighbours, both kind-hearted and irritable, dread her parking the van in front of their houses.

Kind and passive-aggressive soul that he is, Bennett at one point allowed Miss Shepherd to pull the van into his driveway. And there she remained. For 15 years.

The Lady in the Van is mostly about what we owe other people and ourselves. It’s more a reminder of how well and how messily our good intentions play out.

Obviously, Maggie Smith is the reason to see the film and she delivers with impressive honesty. Miss Shepherd is a crazed and imperious woman, a damaged creature who evokes pity and annoyance and sympathy and finally sadness at the ways in which lives get warped. Smith never plays her false — not once does she make the character cuddly or an object lesson to the saner, settled people around her.

In Ms. Smith’s hands, her lady in the van remains complex and unknowable — a mystery to the end. And that is acting.

The Second Mother

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February 11, 2016
Brazil
Location: SilverCity
Showtimes: 6:30 & 8:30 pm

Director: Anna Muylaert
Cast:  Regina Casé, Helena Albergaria, Michel Joelsas
Runtime: 112  minutes
Language: Portuguese
Rating: 14A

Audience Award:   Berlin International Film Festival; Top International Film, National Board of Review; Special Jury Prize, Sundance Film Festival

“Muylaert’s film is an effervescent comic drama that delights in the disruption of traditional upstairs/downstairs dynamics.” – Julian Carrington, Globe and Mail

The opening of The Second Mother—a simple scene of a housekeeper taking care of a young boy after he’s had a swim, while juggling a phone call to her own daughter—encapsulates everything the movie is about. It’s honest, observant, and unaffected, and writer-director Anna Muylaert never falters from that moment on.

Regina Casé plays Val, a woman who has devoted herself to a prosperous family in Sao Paolo as their housekeeper and nanny—while her own daughter has been raised (on her earnings) by her ex-husband and his second wife in her home town, far away.

Suddenly, Val hears from her daughter—whom she hasn’t seen in ten years—because the girl wants to come to Sao Paolo to study at a prestigious university. Seeing Val as one of the family, her employers have no quarrel with young Jessica (Camila Márdila) coming to live with her mother while they look for an apartment of their own.

But once the brash young woman arrives, the household dynamic is thrown out of whack. Muylaert takes her story in unusual directions. Characters reveal colours and facets of themselves not discerned at first.

Val is the anchor of all the emotional tumult, a woman who has willingly sacrificed everything of her own—until her estranged daughter forces her to re-examine her life, and ponder her future. Regina Casé offers a commanding, genuine, and often hilarious performance. Casé and the movie are quite special.

My Internship in Canada

By | 2015-2016 Season | No Comments

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Location: SilverCity

Showtimes: 6:30 & 8:25 pm

Director: Philippe Falardeau
Cast:  Patrick Huard, Suzanne Clément, Irdens Exantus
Runtime: 108 minutes
Language: French, Creole, English

Rating: 14A

Toronto International Film Festival: Best Canadian Feature Film – Special Jury Citation; Hamburg Film Festival Award Nomination: Political Film Award

“This laugh-a-minute farce is grand entertainment.”–Pat Mullen, Cinemablographer

My Internship in Canada focuses on hapless independent Quebec MP Steve Guibord (Patrick Huard, Mommy, Starbuck) and his comical misadventures in trying to manoeuvre the quagmire of local, national and global politics under a clueless, music-obsessed Stephen Harper-like leader.

Guibord is saddled with a constituency of humorously conflicting needs (mining, aboriginal land rights activists, and loggers). A former hockey hero, Guibord finds himself in tricky position when he becomes the swing vote in the Prime Minister’s march to war.

Torn between his personal beliefs and local issues, whatever Steve chooses will make him look like the bad guy to someone. His position is equally ticklish on the home front, flummoxed between his hawkish wife (Suzanne Clément, Mommy), and peacenik daughter (Clémence Dufresne-Deslières).

Adding to his harried affairs is Guibord’s his new, eager, and idealistic Haitian intern, Souverain, (Irdens Exantus) an earnest student of political science who quotes Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s The Social Contract and makes hilarious reports via Skype to his family and friends back home in Haiti.

Director Philippe Falardeau (Monsieur Lazhar, The Good Lie) proves quite adept at softball political satire. Whatever his personal beliefs, Falardeau is even-handed, sending up both conservatives and liberals in equal measure.

Huard is winning as a comically-addled politician, seeing issues from all sides and frustrated when no compromise can be found. Despite the title, it is Huard’s Capra-esque character who takes centre stage and he’s fun to watch.

Trumbo

By | 2015-2016 Season | No Comments

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USA

Location: SilverCity

Showtimes: Thursday, Jan. 14th @ 6:30 & 8:40 pm

Director: Jay Roach
Cast: Bryan Cranston, Diane Lane, Helen Mirren
Runtime: 124 minutes
Language: English
Rating: 14A

Southeastern Film Critics Association Awards: Best Actor, Bryan Cranston

Nominations: Best Actor, Best Supporting Actress: Golden Globes, Screen Actor Guild, San Diego Film Critics Society Awards, San Francisco Film Critics Circle.

“Trumbo reminds us of a very dark time in America as well as Hollywood. Important but also hugely entertaining. Bryan Cranston nails it.” – Pete Hammond, Deadline Hollywood Daily

Trumbo is a compelling collaboration between Bryan Cranston and Jay Roach, who also directed another political pic, HBO’s Game Change, which detailed the bizarre rise of Sarah Palin. Interestingly, there are parallels between then and now.

Churning out his best work while in the bath, Trumbo establishes his reputation with films like Kitty Foyle and A Guy Named Joe. Then he is targeted by Hollywood bigwigs who hate his pro-labour agitation, particular venom coming from gossip columnist Hedda Hopper, played icily by Helen Mirren.

Trumbo winds up serving 11 months in jail for refusing to testify before McCarthy-ite witch-hunters, leaving behind his loyal wife (Diane Lane) and three bewildered children.

The film really ramps up once its cigarette-puffing, scotch-swilling scribe devises a plan to keep himself and fellow black-listers writing scripts under fake names for exploitation producers, including cheese ball brothers played delightfully by John Goodman and Stephen Root. Trumbo goes on to win Oscars for Roman Holiday and The Brave One but only under pseudonyms.

Decked out in droopy mustaches and an increasingly stooped gait, Cranston captures Trumbo as a throwback combination of old-world courtliness and Mark Twain wit.

Other icons pop up including John Wayne (David James Elliott) and Edward G. Robinson (Michael Stuhlbarg). Particularly convincing is Dean O’Gorman as Kirk Douglas, who helped end the blacklist by hiring Trumbo for Spartacus.

Colourful characters, natty costumes, and jaunty music helps Trumbo to bring mid-century Tinseltown to picturesque life.

Grandma

By | 2014-2015 Season | No Comments

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Date: Thursday, November 12 ,2015
USA
Location: SilverCity
Showtimes: 6:30 & 8:15 pm

Director: Paul Weitz
Cast: Lily Tomlin, Marcia Gay Harden, Julia Garner, Sam Elliott
Runtime: 92 minutes
Rating: 14A

“An initially breezy family comedy about mothers, daughters and abortions that slowly sneaks up on you and packs a major wallop.” — Scott Foundas, Variety

“Writer-director Paul Weitz turns in a generous, handcrafted piece in which everyone shines.”–Simon Houpt, Globe and Mail

Lily Tomlin is all razor-sharp wit and no-nonsense in Grandma, an engaging film from Paul Weitz (Little Fockers) about three generations of women in the same family.

Tomlin stars as Elle, an acerbic poet and academic. She is also a lesbian and outspoken feminist who doesn’t suffer fools gladly. While still capable of wonder, Elle mostly marvels at the stupidity of the general populace.

As Grandma opens, Elle is breaking up with her much-younger girlfriend (Judy Greer); while still in mourning over the love of her life, a woman named Violet.

One morning, Elle’s teenaged granddaughter turns up at her house. Sage (Julia Garner) is pregnant and bent on having an abortion, but she doesn’t have the $600 necessary for the procedure. Sage doesn’t want to go to her perfectionist mother, Judy (Marcia Gay Harden) who also intimidates Elle.

The two women go on the road to find the money. Stops include a (costly) free clinic, an dead-end exchange with Sage’s boyfriend, a visit to a hip cafe, and finally Elle’s meeting with Karl (Sam Elliott), a guy from her distant past.

Grandma may appear to be political, but it’s really a story about the passage of time and the various roads not taken in life — and how that all looks from a perspective of 50 years. Grandma is both funny and heartbreaking, achieving laughter without making light of serious issues.

Sharp, insightful writing and luminous performances combine to make Grandma a welcome cinematic treat.

Jimmy’s Hall

By | 2014-2015 Season | No Comments

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France/Belgium

Location: SilverCity

Date: October 29th, 2015

Showtimes: 6:30 & 8:25 pm

Director: Saul Dibb
Cast: Michelle Williams, Matthias Schoenaerts, Kristin Scott Thomas
Runtime: 107 minutes
Language: English, German
Rating: 14A

“War’s impact on the lonely heart is nearly as devastating as the havoc wreaked on limb and landscape.”–Geoff Pevere, Globe and Mail

“With palpable tension and poignancy, Suite Francaise is fine filmmaking well worth watching.”–Bruce Demara, Toronto Star

The film, Suite Francaise, is a handsome and intelligent adaptation of the writings of Irène Némirovsky – the Russian-born French writer who died in Auschwitz and whose two unpublished novellas emerged in 2004 as one book, Suite Francaise. In her late thirties at the time of writing, Némirovsky fictionalized the lives of people around her in German-occupied France.

Taking the novel’s lead, director Saul Dibb’s nuanced, compelling film offers an intriguing close-up portrait of Bussy, a northern French village forced to host a garrison of Nazi soldiers. At the film’s heart is a sort-of romance between timid Lucile (Michelle Williams), and a cultured, piano-playing Nazi officer, Bruno (Matthias Schoenaerts). But more lasting than the film’s romantic angle is the snapshot that Dibb (Bullet Boy, The Duchess) offers of a class-ridden society under the spotlight of occupation.

The themes of collaboration, compassion and betrayal run through the film, and characters who initially seem to be one thing, like Lucile’s hard-hearted mother-in-law (Kristin Scott Thomas), emerge as more complex. Even the film’s portrayal of the Nazi soldiers rises above stereotypical melodramatic colouring. Also refreshing is a sense that we’re thrown into the middle of the uncertainty of war; Suite Française works hard to free itself from the benefit of hindsight. The film is a textured, thoughtful piece of work.

Suite Francaise

By | 2015-2016 Season | No Comments

2

3

France/Belgium

Location: SilverCity

Showtimes: 6:30 & 8:25 pm

Director: Saul Dibb
Cast: Michelle Williams, Matthias Schoenaerts, Kristin Scott Thomas
Runtime: 107 minutes
Language: English, German
Rating: 14A

“War’s impact on the lonely heart is nearly as devastating as the havoc wreaked on limb and landscape.”–Geoff Pevere, Globe and Mail

“With palpable tension and poignancy, Suite Francaise is fine filmmaking well worth watching.”–Bruce Demara, Toronto Star

The film, Suite Francaise, is a handsome and intelligent adaptation of the writings of Irène Némirovsky – the Russian-born French writer who died in Auschwitz and whose two unpublished novellas emerged in 2004 as one book, Suite Francaise. In her late thirties at the time of writing, Némirovsky fictionalized the lives of people around her in German-occupied France.

Taking the novel’s lead, director Saul Dibb’s nuanced, compelling film offers an intriguing close-up portrait of Bussy, a northern French village forced to host a garrison of Nazi soldiers. At the film’s heart is a sort-of romance between timid Lucile (Michelle Williams), and a cultured, piano-playing Nazi officer, Bruno (Matthias Schoenaerts). But more lasting than the film’s romantic angle is the snapshot that Dibb (Bullet Boy, The Duchess) offers of a class-ridden society under the spotlight of occupation.

The themes of collaboration, compassion and betrayal run through the film, and characters who initially seem to be one thing, like Lucile’s hard-hearted mother-in-law (Kristin Scott Thomas), emerge as more complex. Even the film’s portrayal of the Nazi soldiers rises above stereotypical melodramatic colouring. Also refreshing is a sense that we’re thrown into the middle of the uncertainty of war; Suite Française works hard to free itself from the benefit of hindsight. The film is a textured, thoughtful piece of work.

Mr. Holmes

By | 2014-2015 Season | No Comments

September 24, 2015, SilverCity

Showtimes: 6:30 pm & 8:30 pm

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UNITED KINGDOM/USA
Director: Bill Condon
Cast: Ian McKellen, Laura Linney, Hiroyuki Sanada
Runtime: 104 min
Language: English, Japanese
Ratings: PG Read More